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Alison Jacques Gallery: KLARA KRISTALOVA | RYAN MOSLEY - 27 Feb 2009 to 11 Apr 2009

Current Exhibition


27 Feb 2009 to 11 Apr 2009
Hours : tuesday - saturday, 10 - 6
OPENING THURSDAY 26 FEBRUARY, 6-8PM
Alison Jacques Gallery
16 - 18 BERNERS STREET
W1T 3LN
London
United Kingdom
Europe
p: +44 (0) 20 7631 4720
m:
f: +44 (0) 20 7631 4750
w: www.alisonjacquesgallery.com











KLARA KRISTALOVA: WHERE THE OWLS SPEND THEIR DAYS
12
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Artists in this exhibition: KLARA KRISTALOVA, RYAN MOSLEY


KLARA KRISTALOVA: WHERE THE OWLS SPEND THEIR DAYS

27 FEBRUARY – 11 APRIL 2009
OPENING THURSDAY 26 FEBRUARY, 6-8PM


“Kristalova steers clear of the rhetorical aspects of art, and instead deals with the small narratives, dreams and nightmares that everyday life is full of. She is drawn to an invisible part of everyday existence, to a realm where our expectations take shape, where neuroses bloom and memories mutate. This often results in her work acquiring a bizarre, slightly unsettling quality. Who would, after all, want to come face to face with the physical embodiment of one’s own inner demons?” Anders Olofsson, Klara Kristalova Sculptures, published by Karlsson / Perrotin, 2007.

Alison Jacques Gallery is pleased to announce the first London solo exhibition of the Czech-born artist Klara Kristalova who lives and works in Sweden. Working with plaster, bronze, wood and ceramics, often in proportions traditionally associated with ornamental objects, the artist’s expressionist renderings of figures, heads and torsos, frequently allude to sinister psychological narratives. Kristalova is a storyteller who uses the plasticity of sculpture to conjure allegories, dreams and nightmares that are evocative of fairytales or folklore. Her iconography includes trees and snow capped forests, toadstools, and a host of animals that exist alongside more surreal objects such as a half-gloved hand or isolated facial features.

In Kristalova’s London exhibition, the main gallery space is dominated by a tall shelved display cabinet in which sit a number of glazed clay sculptures of various sizes. This piece of furniture not only explores traditional modes of display for ceramic objects but also refers to the psyche, with the individual pieces within and around it signifying different states of mind.

Often depicted as suffocating or drowning, Kristalova’s cast of characters frequently express feelings of entrapment. The artist morphs or collapses figures into natural forms; hands and feet are extended with tree-like protrusions that suggest both a separation of the figures from their surroundings, and a connection to nature. The brittle qualities of ceramic accentuate and highlight Kristalova’s characters’ imagined social awkwardness and physical fragility.

Klara Kristalova (Born 1967) lives and works in Norrtälje, Sweden. Recent solo exhibitions include Short Stories, Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin, Paris (2008) and Catastrophes and Other Everyday Events, Galleri Magnus Karlsson, Stockholm, (2007). Group shows include Past, Present, Future Perfect: Selections from the Ovitz Family Collection, H&R Block Artspace, Kansas City (2008) and Makers and modelers, Gladstone Gallery, New York (2007). Forthcoming solo shows include SITE Santa Fe, USA (2009). Kristalova will also participate in Expanded Fields of Possibilities, Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum and Sortilèges, Fondation pour l’art contemporain Claudine et Jean-Marc Salomon, France (2009). Kristalova’s work is featured in public collections includingModerna Museet, Stockholm.


TUESDAY 24 MARCH, 6PM: GALLERY TALK BY SUE HUBBARD
Sue Hubbard is an award-winning poet, fiction writer, and art critic. She is a regular contributor to The Independent and The New Statesman where she writes on contemporary art. She has contributed to a wide range of publications including The Independent on Sunday, Art Review, Contemporary, Tate, Third Text and The RA Magazine and has written catalogue essays on many leading artists. She has published two collections of poetry, a novel and, this autumn, her first collection of short stories, Rothko's Red, available from Salt Publishing.




PROJECT ROOM: RYAN MOSLEY

27 FEBRUARY – 11 APRIL 2009
OPENING THURSDAY 26 FEBRUARY, 6-8PM


Mosley transposes the sixteenth-century classical Italian theatrical form of the commedia dell'arte into a painted realm inhabited by the ghosts of Goya, Guston, Ensor and the masked grotesques of Tiepolo. …Mosley blends the absurd with the disturbing, the pictorial with the theatrical and the protean with the prosaic. Good art changes the way one looks at the world, and Mosley's work, at its best, has the ability to repopulate our world with a burlesque line-up of a troupe of beings from an alternate reality which points up the absurdity and peculiarities of our own.
(Richard Dyer, Art Review, 2008)

Alison Jacques Gallery is pleased to announce Ryan Mosley’s first solo presentation at the gallery. Half Man Half Doughnut - The Resurrection is one of Mosley’s most recent works and will be exhibited in the project room as the first in a new series of presentations, each of which will be supplemented by a printed interview and a talk by the artist.

This large-scale painting comes from a new body of work which casts a band of characters – acrobats, musicians, snake-charmers – in a circus of sorts. Mosley's alchemy vivifies inanimate objects with human qualities and, in this case, his process of anthropomorphism transforms a doughnut into a ringmaster. This character is poised in a precarious balancing act with snakes, balloons and a surreal scattering of heads on legs. These monopods have a legacy that can be traced back to the 13th century and a myth propagated by European explorers claiming that the inhabitants of the Asiatic region did not have bodies like their occidental counterparts. Other renditions can be found in stone carvings on Gothic cathedrals, in the 15th century Nuremberg Chronicle and more recent literary appearances include Umberto Eco's Baudolino. Like folk tales, these imaginary creatures have evolved as their descriptions are passed on from one story-teller to the next.

Mosley's compositions are replete with such folkloric subject matter, which is contextualised with recognisable art historical traditions, from Arcimboldo's composite portraits to the story-telling traditions of Brueghel and 17th Dutch genre painting. There is an ambiguous tone in Mosley’s paintings which are imbued with a carnivalesque revelry, a dark humour and grotesque disfigurements which seem to speak to the surreal workings of the psyche. Gathering weird, hybrid beings together, like a Victorian curiosity show with body parts pickled in jars, Mosley's paintings illustrate a bizarre, even sinister, ethnography.

Ryan Mosley (Born 1980, Chesterfield, UK) lives and works in London. Mosley graduated from the Royal College of Art, London, in 2007. Forthcoming exhibitions in 2009 include the Saatchi Gallery exhibition Newspeak at The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg (group show) and the Jerwood Contemporary Painters Prize at The Jerwood Space, London (touring). In 2008 Mosley had a solo exhibition with Engholm Engelhorn, Vienna and was included in Moravia at Cell Project Space, London and The Painting Room at Transition Gallery, London. Mosley was selected for the Celeste Art Prize Exhibition in 2007 and in the same year exhibited at IBID Projects in Summer School.


TUESDAY 17 MARCH, 6PM: ARTIST'S TALK BY RYAN MOSLEY

Next Exhibition: Mathew Weir, 17 April – 16 May, opening Thursday 16 April, 6-8pm

For further info: +44 207 631 4720 / email: press @alisonjacquesgallery.com


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