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Mark Gerard Brogan

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Breadwinner under Pressure
Breadwinner under Pressure
their art could be as beautiful, scary and stupid as life itself. If Cézanne is the father of the former methodology, Van Gogh must be father of the latter. His goal is to express the overwhelming sensuality of the world, and he does this in a rather literal, unrefined way through the use of impasto paintwork. Think of Sunflowers where the two dimensional representation grows outward towards the viewer in great swirls of sculpted yellow paint. This link between the sensuous oily pigment and the material presence of the objects to be expressed is brilliantly captured in Robert Altman’s film Vincent and Theo when Van Gogh, unable to decide which colour paints to buy, scoops some of each into his mouth, contemplating their taste.
Gloss Castration
Gloss Castration
The Artist’s Fingers

Art. The zenith of humankind: noble, exalted and spiritual; in a word, sublime. In chemistry, sublimation describes the transformation from a solid to a gaseous state without an intervening liquid stage. So it is with great art: the transubstantiation from base matter – pigment, clay, wood etc – into the priceless object of inexplicable spiritual beauty


Reclining Nude
Reclining Nude
From 1995
From 1995
and truth. Sublimation is also a psychoanalytic term, of course, relating to the impetus for intellectual and sensuous creativity – the diversion of the sexual drive into cultural pursuits, according to Freud. Civilization in action. In Mark Brogan’s paint-sculptures the dumb re-materialization of the spiritual art object reveals in an idiotically obvious way the de-sublimation of artistic high purpose to the gurgling pleasures and anxieties of infantile sexuality.

‘I am for the art out of a doggy’s mouth, falling five stories from the roof.
I am for the art that a kid licks, after peeling away the wrapper’
Claes Oldenburg I am for an Art

Brogan’s most striking method to date has involved the use of gloss paint, laid out to dry in large rectangles and then rolled up like tight pancakes, which are then hung, tied in knots or otherwise manipulated – a kind of painting in the third dimension. His work therefore relates to two opposed notions of artistic development in modernism, roughly speaking a classical and romantic sensibility. If the familiar narrative of modernism has been the disappearance of representation itself through an increasing abstraction and reduction to the limitations of the material form of the canvas, until the very distinction between painting and sculpture breaks down, an alternative lineage would include artists like Guston and Oldenburg who rejected the insularity of formalist development (for Greenberg the protection of
representation itself through an increasing abstraction and reduction to the limitations of the material form of the canvas, until the very distinction between painting and sculpture breaks down, an alternative lineage would include artists like Guston and Oldenburg who rejected the insularity of formalist development (for Greenberg the protection of high culture from mass produced kitsch) in order that their art could be as beautiful, scary and stupid as life itself. If Cézanne is the father of the former methodology, Van Gogh must be father of the latter. His goal is to express the overwhelming sensuality of the world, and he does this in a rather literal, unrefined way through the use of impasto paintwork. Think of Sunflowers where the two dimensional representation grows outward towards the viewer in great swirls of sculpted yellow paint. This link between the sensuous oily pigment and the material presence of the objects to be expressed is brilliantly captured in Robert Altman’s film Vincent and Theo when Van Gogh, unable to decide which colour paints to buy, scoops some of each into his mouth, contemplating their taste.
Reclining Nude II
Reclining Nude II
There is something undeniably tasty in Mark Brogan’s paint-skin sculptures too – like chocolate sauce, bubble gum or coloured liquorice. It brings to mind Oldenburg’s vinyl lollipop and hotdog, but also his limp furniture. Oldenburg shares Van Gogh’s exuberance and anxiety, but now in relation to a world of mass-produced pop consumables. One aspect of this is the creation of a shiny new universe of materials and colours spewed forth by petro-chemical technology: domestic objects, toys and sexy new clothing. The sensuality of oil


Europe



Web Links
www.markgerardbrogan.com
www.dailymotion.com/MarkBrogan#videoId=xe63sk
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